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Engineering  |  The Polytechnic School

High Altitude Chamber Training

Contact Aviation

Simulator Building
7442 E Innovation Way North
Mesa, AZ 85212-2880

Phone: (480) 727-1021
Email: aerotech@asu.edu

Aviation Program visits are by appointment. Prospective students can schedule an appointment to meet our faculty members, tour the Simulator Building and learn more about degree programs at visit.asu.edu

Training

The two high altitude chambers located at the ASU Polytechnic High Altitude Chamber Laboratory provide a unique, realistic and safe environment for lifesaving training in hypoxia awareness, prevention, and treatment. All courses are FAA Part 141 certified, and chamber flight profiles follow established formats that can be customized to fit different customer requirements. Classroom sessions for altitude chamber training can also be developed to fit different environments. These chambers are also valuable for product research, testing, and development, and fundamental R&D and have been used by various entities for these purposes.

Training sessions and chamber flight profiles can be tailored to fit your needs. All High Altitude Chamber participants are required by FAA regulations to read, speak, write and understand the English Language. For more information, contact the High Altitude Chamber.

Upcoming Training Dates

>No upcoming events

Chamber Flight Profiles

There are a number of profiles depending on individual needs. The commonly used chamber profiles are:

  • STANDARD/GENERAL AVIATION PROFILE – Ear and sinus up to 6,000 feet and back to G.L. Ascend to 25,000 feet at 3,000 feet/min. Level for hypoxia demonstration. Complete hypoxia demonstration and descend to 18,000 feet at 3,000 feet/min for Night Vision Demonstration. Conduct Night Vision Demonstration and descend to G.L. at 3,000 feet/min.
  • ENHANCED PROFILE – Ear and sinus check to 6,000 feet and back to G.L. Ascend to 10,000 feet and remove oxygen mask. Ascend to 18,000 feet at 1,000 feet/min. for insidious hypoxia onset demonstration. Level at 18,000 feet and don oxygen mask. Ascend to 25,000 feet at 3,000 feet/min for rapid onset hypoxia demonstration. Complete rapid onset hypoxia demonstration and descend to 18,000 feet at 3,000 feet/min for Night Vision Demonstration. Complete Night Vision Demonstration and descend to G.L. at 3,000 feet/min. Rapid Decompression will immediately follow.
  • RAPID DECOMPRESSION – Ear and sinus check up to 6,000 feet and back to Ground Level (G.L.) Climb to 8,000 feet and level. Slow or Rapid Decompression to 22,000 feet. Return to G.L. Rates of ascent and descent are set according to customer requirements/desires.
  • HELICOPTER – Ear and sinus check up to 6,000 feet and back to G.L. Slow ascent (500 feet/min) to 18,000 feet. Level for hypoxia demonstration. Complete hypoxia demonstration. Start Night Vision Demonstration. Conduct Night Vision Demonstration and descend to G.L. at 500 feet/min.
  • FIGHTER – Ear and sinus check up to 6,000 feet and back to G.L. Ascend to 25,000 feet at 5,000 feet/min. Level at 25,000 feet and do hypoxia demonstration. Complete hypoxia demonstration and descend to 18,000 feet for Night Vision Demonstration. Conduct Night Vision Demonstration and descend to G.L. at 5,000 feet/min. Rapid Decompression profile will immediately follow.
  • INFLIGHT ATTENDENT PROFILE – Ear and sinus check to 6,000 feet and back to G.L. Ascend to 25,000 feet at 3,000 feet/min. Level for hypoxia demonstration. Complete hypoxia demonstration and descend to G.L. at 3,000 feet/min. Rapid Decompression will immediately follow.
  • SPORT PILOT PROFILE – Ear and sinus check up to 6,000 feet and back to G.L. Remove oxygen mask and ascend at 1,000 feet/min to 18,000 feet for insidious hypoxia onset demonstration. Level and complete hypoxia demonstration. Descend to G.L. at 1,000 feet/min.

All courses are one day in duration and provide academic instruction in:

  • Hypoxia, including:
    • the signs and symptoms of hypoxia;
    • recognition of your personal hypoxia symptoms;
    • the appropriate emergency procedures that will allow quick and accurate treatment of your symptoms;
    • how to recognize the symptoms of hypoxia exhibited by others;
    • preventive measures to help you avoid hypoxia and other high-altitude maladies; and
    • hyperventilation.
  • Trapped gas disorders
  • Evolved gas disorders (decompression sickness)
  • Vision
  • Physics of the Atmosphere
  • Respiration/Circulation
  • Pressurization
  • G-Facts

Individual pilot tolerance to hypoxia changes daily and is influenced by every changing factors such as stress, age, physical condition, diet, rest or fatigue. Knowledge of their own individual hypoxia symptoms will help them recognize the onset of this life threatening condition even when it occurs at relatively low altitudes. This could save the lives of pilot and passengers alike.

Other course topics include:

  • Oxygen equipment
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Smoke and toxic fumes
  • Fatigue
  • Spatial disorientation
  • Cabin depressurization
  • Health and wellness
  • Self-imposed stress
  • Crew resource management
  • Human factors

All academic subjects are presented in the morning with the chamber flights occurring after lunch.

Requirements to take altitude chamber training are:

  • At least 18 years old
  • A current Class I, II, or III FAA Medical Certificate