Engineering (EGR 402 e-Projects) at Innovation Showcase

This program prepares students to be creative problem solvers who help shape the future. Students collaborate in teams to design, manufacture and deliver innovative technological products and services. Industry partners sponsor many of these projects, bringing unmatched, real-world experiences into the learning environment.

Innovation Showcase engr

Sponsor: Zero EV

 

 


Zero EV, or ZEV, has tasked this team with developing an active cooling system to reduce temperatures of battery cells while charging. In the age of fast charging, heat is a battery’s worst nightmare. Fast charging introduces high wattage and results in high heat output at the battery cell level. Developing an auxiliary cooling system to actively cool the battery cells will allow high wattage charging. This developed system will bring value to ZEV and allow their engineers to use fast charging and market it as a feature when the car initially goes for sale. Not only is it a good way to stimulate purchase interest, it will put ZEV in direct competition with Tesla, Porsche, Chevy and others who also offer fast charging. Behind battery life, having fast charging capabilities in an electric vehicle is of high value and what consumers are looking for when considering an EV.

 

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Students: Daniel Domzalski, Zachary Jaap, Kristyn Helgevold

Sponsor:

general dynamics

 


General Dynamics is supplying the U.S. Coast Guard with antennas that are used in maritime search and rescue missions. They are shipped in cardboard boxes that are not effective at protecting the antennas from impacts or vibrations. However, the prohibitive cost of shipping sturdier wood containers back to the manufacturer has caused a decline in profits earned for the company and products are still arriving damaged. The solution that this team designed is a modular crate that utilizes t-slot aluminum beams and 3D printed PLA supports. This design was chosen because the slots allow for the easy dismantlement of the crate to save space for reshipping while still maintaining security and ruggedness when configured.

Innovation Showcase - Intel

Sponsor:

Intel

 

 


This group paired with Intel to maximize speaker performance in laptops. Intel presented a problem with modern day laptops and how next generation laptop users require an efficient use of speaker sound. The issue with these laptops is that with evolving laptops becoming foldable in 360°, the speaker quality and placement weren’t effectively firing at the user. This team tackled the issue of finding a way to integrate a speaker system into the lid of the laptop on the display side to ensure that regardless of the mode of use, the speaker will always be pointing directly towards the user. In addition to this implementation, they were tasked to find a small market speaker that produces the smoothest range of sound.

 

Innovation Showcase - engr

Sponsor:

Intel

 

 


The Intel Compute Card is a new computer standard for smart devices and delivers the power of a PC in a modular device approximately the size of a credit card. The Intel compute card has everything their customers need including RAM, storage and WiFi already built-in. This tiny computer has a universal interface that allows it to be plugged into any host drive with an Intel Compute Card slot, including an Intel-design dock. Suddenly it is easy to integrate, compute and connect into everything. This miniaturized, portable, self-contained computer is designed to fit into stationary docks at preexisting locations, but transferring heat from the interior of the sealed casing proves problematic and is critical to a successful operation. There has not yet been a solution discovered for cooling which meets acceptable requirements for performance and size restrictions. The casing around the internal Compute Card circuitry traps significant heat generated during live operations but is necessary for product durability. This team’s solution is to design a part of the dock unrelated to interface with the Compute Card and design a PCB within the card itself.

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Sponsor:

Honeywell

 


This project is about improving the high-pressure cold spray process. In order for Honeywell to use the high-pressure cold spray process for certain repairs on aircraft parts, they require a material that can be used for hard masking. Hard masking is a device that is attached to the part to protect the areas that don’t require repair from the repair spray. This group was tasked with researching, investigating and identifying possible materials that can withstand extreme temperatures, high impact and pressure forces, and that is easily removed after the repair is complete. This team’s solution is to take the materials that they identify as potentially viable for this use and test them in a high-pressure cold spray repair cycle. They can then select the best material and make recommendations to Honeywell based on testing results.

 

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Sponsor:

Honeywell

 


Developments in additive manufacturing (AM) have expanded design options available to companies, allowing for the optimization of current processes to be explored. Through the use of these developments, Honeywell would like to consider implementing internal lattice structures within aircraft propulsion engine components. This new method of manufacturing has the potential to reduce the weight of components while maintaining performance and durability requirements. This team was given the opportunity to work alongside Honeywell to further this research through additively manufacturing a compressor stator with an internal lattice structure. Their goal is to develop a modeling procedure for this component, optimize the component design to minimize weight within design constraints, fabricate a fixturing mechanism for testing and print the optimized geometry.

 

Honeywell group photo

Sponsor:

Honeywell

 


This team has joined in an industrial partnership with Honeywell Aerospace to help develop a solution to a manufacturing bottleneck that the company needs to eliminate by streamlining multiple manufacturing processes into a single process. Honeywell Aerospace is a leader in the field of aviation and aerospace that produces a wide range of product solutions. The goal of this project is to find a new method to manufacture the first stage crossover duct (that exists as a component within a high-performance turboprop engine), and produce a design that will decrease overall cost, lead time and increase performance while maintaining operating life. This team’s solution is to overhaul the existing crossover duct design to be suitable for additive manufacturing, while maintaining or improving existing specifications. This will reduce production costs and reduce weight while providing similar performance and life expectancy.

 

Innovation Showcase engr

Students: Joshua Dorman, Brendon Thompson, Alan Jones

Sponsors:

KW Mission Critical EngineeringEdgeCore

 


This team is working alongside kW Mission Critical Engineering and EdgeCore to design a system to reject heat from high density data centers. Modern data centers are being pushed to their limit due to an increase in AI and high performance computing. The power infrastructure to support these facilities creates enormous amounts of heat that needs to be cooled and maintained to ensure quality performance of the IT equipment. The proposed design solution is a combination of equipment and the layout of the data center to enhance heat management. Efficiency in heat management and power usage is improved by incorporating water cooled rear door heat exchangers and advanced AutoDesk simulations to validate the placement and performance of components.

Benchmark

Sponsor: Benchmark


Benchmark approached this team to design and build an automated device that can transport finished machined parts through a series of cleaning tanks. The current cleaning process is done manually or outsourced to a third party vendor. This has limited production output and has led to a large cleaning expense. An automated part transfer device will increase the overall volume of finished parts while simultaneously reducing chances of damage caused by user error. This team’s design solution is a device that utilizes a horizontal and vertical linear actuator that can move parts from one cleaning tub to the next. This device’s cleaning cycle is full automated and fulfills Benchmarks requirement for a successful Type 1 clean.

 

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Sponsor:

L&H Industrial

 

 


This team designed and built a new internal spline cutting tool for L&H Industrial. L&H currently uses an aging end mill to cut internal splines on large metal Dragline Excavator components. This tool is not cost or time efficient for L&H. This team developed a new cutting tool that uses a variety of cutting wheels to machine the splines faster. This tool can also machine longer splines, takes less time to set up and it has dedicated mounts for the lubrication lines.

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Sponsor:

BAE Systems Inc.

 


BAE Systems Inc. is the United States subsidiary of the international defense firm BAE Systems, Plc. with a special contract under the U.S. government to develop U.S.-only defense projects. One of these projects outsourced work to this team to explore alternative ballistic defense mechanisms. Previous work by students involved tumbling a projectile with lattice-based striker designs constructed using laser additive manufacturing methods, thus, leaving room for the possibility of shattering a projectile upon impact with the striker’s face. This team is currently exploring the possibility of shattering a projectile through heat treating lattice structures constructed using similar laser additive manufacturing. As it stands, hardening the material may prove to withstand the impact of the projectile, while subsequently shattering it. Multiple lattice structures with varying component depths are being tested as a viable solution to providing more cost effective and efficient products.